Press Releases

Citizens’ Committee for Children of New York Releases Preliminary Analysis of New Census Data Released Today

Released September 14, 2017

For Immediate Release: September 14, 2017
Contact: Elysia Murphy, emurphy@cccnewyork.org, 212-673-1800 ext. 18

Today, the United States Census Bureau released data for 2016 on income and poverty levels in New York City.  There was a fair amount of good news.  The poverty rate declined from 20.0% in 2015 to 18.9% in 2016, bringing it to within less than a point of its 2008 pre-recession level.  Importantly, the decrease in poverty rate was felt across racial/ethnic groups, with blacks and Latinos enjoying the largest decreases in poverty of nearly two percentage points each. The child poverty rate decreased two points, from 28.6% in 2015 to 26.6% in 2016, statistically unchanged from 2008.

After increasing 5% last year, median household income increased another 4% from $52,509 to $57,976 in 2016, putting it over its 2008 pre-recession peak of just under $57,000 (all amounts in 2016 dollars) and unlike last year, median income for families with children not only kept pace with overall household income growth, but exceeded it. Median income for families with children increased 10% from $52,509 in 2015 to just under $58,000 in 2016, well ahead of its 2008 level of just under $56,000.

Amidst this welcome news, there are some areas of concern:

Poverty in Staten Island

Every borough – including Staten Island – experienced reductions in the poverty rate from 2015 to 2016.  However, at 13.2% in 2016, the poverty rate in Staten Island is still 3.2 points higher than before the recession, by far the largest gap of the five boroughs.  Staten Island was the lone borough in which the child poverty rate increased from 2015 to 2016, and at 19.1% is 4.3 points higher than before the recession.

Income gains concentrated in Manhattan and Brooklyn

While every borough experienced income gains from 2015 to 2016, the extent to which boroughs have exceeded their pre-recession median incomes varies drastically.  The median household income in Brooklyn in 2016 is 14% higher than before the recession.  In every other borough, median household income is either lower or statistically unchanged from before the recession.  For families with children, median income is up 37% in Manhattan compared to before the recession, and 12% in Brooklyn; no other borough has experienced such substantial gains compared to before the recession.

Widening of Racial/Ethnic Income Gap since Recession

The gap in median household income between racial/ethnic groups widened drastically during the recession and, in some cases, is continuing to grow.  In 2008, white households had a median income that was 75% higher than black households, 31% percent higher than Asian households, and 106% higher than Latino households.  Those numbers increased substantially during the recession, and in 2016, white households had a median income 83% higher than black households, 38% higher than Asian households, and 115% higher than Latino households.

There is much to celebrate in the latest poverty and income numbers, but it is important to consider whether these gains are being felt equally across our large and diverse city.  The positive trends in poverty and income – particularly in the past year – should not mask the persistent and, in some cases increasing disparities that exist geographically and between racial/ethnic groups.  Furthermore, while returning to pre-recession levels has been a difficult goal to reach, we hope that momentum can be continued to further reduce the number of residents – especially children – living in poverty and economically insecure households.

 

Poverty 2008 2015 2016 15/16 change 08/16 change
New York City 18.2% 20.0% 18.9% -1.1% 0.7%
Bronx 27.6% 30.4% 28.7% -1.7% 1.1%
Brooklyn 21.1% 22.3% 20.6% -1.7% -0.5%
Manhattan 16.9% 17.6% 17.3% -0.3% 0.4%
Queens 12.1% 13.8% 13.2% -0.6% 1.1%
Staten Island 10.0% 14.4% 13.2% -1.2% 3.2%
Asian 17.3% 18.3% 17.8% -0.5% 0.5%
Black 21.2% 22.7% 20.8% -1.9% -0.4%
Latino 26.0% 28.4% 26.6% -1.8% 0.6%
White 11.1% 12.0% 11.7% -0.3% 0.6%
Child Poverty 2008 2015 2016 15/16 change 08/16 change
New York City 26.5% 28.6% 26.6% -2.0% 0.1%
Bronx 39.7% 42.9% 40.1% -2.8% 0.4%
Brooklyn 30.4% 31.3% 28.4% -2.9% -2.0%
Manhattan 21.8% 24.3% 23.1% -1.2% 1.3%
Queens 16.4% 18.8% 17.4% -1.4% 1.0%
Staten Island 14.8% 18.2% 19.1% 0.9% 4.3%
Median Household Income 2008 2015 2016 15/16 change 08/16 change
New York City 56982 56457 58856 4.3% 3.3%
Bronx 39054 35620 37525 5.3% -3.9%
Brooklyn 48356 51787 55150 6.5% 14.0%
Manhattan 76938 76530 77559 1.3% 0.8%
Queens 62465 61186 62207 1.7% -0.4%
Staten Island 82361 72527 77197 6.4% -6.3%
Black 45552 42799 46330 8.2% 1.7%
Asian 60620 61534 61547 0.0% 1.5%
Latino 38541 38305 39410 2.9% 2.3%
White 79596 81694 84672 3.6% 6.4%
Median Income, Families with Children 2008 2015 2016 15/16 change 08/16 change
New York City 55920 52509 57976 10.4% 3.7%
Bronx 35499 32065 36583 14.1% 3.1%
Brooklyn 49771 50832 55900 10.0% 12.3%
Manhattan 80901 91181 110711 21.4% 36.8%
Queens 66121 58465 64829 10.9% -2.0%
Staten Island 91945 84929 94116 10.8% 2.4%

 

 

About CCC
Citizens’ Committee for Children of New York educates and mobilizes New Yorkers to make the city a better place for children. Since 1944, our advocacy has combined public policy research and data analysis with citizen action. We cast light on the issues, educate the public, engage allies, and identify and promote practical solutions to ensure that every New York City child is healthy, housed, educated and safe. For more information on CCC, visit our website at www.cccnewyork.org. Stay up to date on the latest news and information regarding the well-being of New York City’s children by following us on Facebook and Twitter.
# # #

 

Download
  • stay informed

    Help us make sure every child is healthy, housed, educated and safe. Sign up for e-mail updates.

css.php