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CBO Centers are essential to educating NYC’s young children

Community-based organization (CBOs) programs provide services for most young children enrolled in the city-funded early childhood education system — particularly those with high economic need.
Currently, there are 81,611 children under age 5 enrolled in early education services at Department of Education (DOE) schools and CBO centers. Of these children, 62% (50,906) are taught in community-based centers.
The city pays CBO educators, who are mostly women of color, significantly less than their peers at the Department of Education (DOE). This pay inequity, in addition to other risks factors, now compromise program stability and quality.


Over 70% of CBO Pre-K teachers are people of color, while just 40% of DOE Pre-K teachers are people of color, according to the National Center for Children and Families at Teachers College, Columbia University.


BA certified teacher salary gap progression

MA certified teacher salary gap progression

DOE

CBO

Pay disparity among CBO and DOE teachers widens over time according to the most recent UFT Teachers Contracts and DC 1707 Contract.

We urge Mayor de Blasio and the Department of Education to end pay disparity and to build a stable birth-to-5 early education system that invests in high-quality programs. An investment in CBO teachers and essential program components is an investment in children, families, and communities.

Click on each button to learn more about the important role CBOs play in each borough.

•There are 105,951 children under 5 in the Bronx, making up 20% of all NYC’s young children.
•Bronx has more than 20,000 young children enrolled in the city-funded early childhood education system. CBOs educate and care for more than half of these children.
•The Bronx has the largest share of children enrolled (19%) in contracted care. The NYC average is about 16.5%.

Bronx Young Children Enrolled in Contracted Services by Setting


•There are 193,410 children under 5 in Brooklyn, making up more than a third (35%) of all NYC’s young children.
•Brooklyn has 30,093 children under 5 enrolled in contracted care. CBOs educate more than half (57.9%) of them.
•Brooklyn’s share of children enrolled in contracted care (15%) is just below the city-wide average (16.5%)

Brooklyn Young Children Enrolled in Contracted Services by Setting


•There are 80,023 children under 5 in Manhattan 14.5% of all NYC’s young children.
•Manhattan has 12,395 children under 5 enrolled in city-funded early childhood education system. CBOs educate more than half (52%) of them.
•Manhattan’s share of young children enrolled in contracted care is 15.5%. The NYC average is about 16.5%.

Manhattan Young Children Enrolled in Contracted Services by Setting


•There are 145,810 children under 5 in Queens making up 26.4% of all NYC’s young children.
•Queens has 24,117 children under 5 enrolled in city-funded early childhood education system. CBOs educate and care for more than half (56%) of them.
•Queens’ share of young children enrolled in contracted care is 16.5%, matching the citywide average

Queens Young Children Enrolled in Contracted Services by Setting


•There are 27,382 children under 5 in Staten Island making up 5% of all NYC’s young children.
•Staten Island has 4,276 children under 5 enrolled in city-funded early childhood education system. CBOs educate and care for more than half (52%) of them.
•Staten Island’s share of young children enrolled in contracted care is 15.6%. The citywide average is 16.5%.

Staten Island Young Children Enrolled in Contracted Services by Setting


Download a pdf of the report here. Also, urge the city to end the pay disparity by clicking here.

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  • Pat Watkins says:

    This is a most important issue and deserves a resolution after many years of conversations. The reasoning behind most of the pay inequality is tied to lack of education. For the DECE’s expansion into 0-5, there needs to be training programs developed that specifically support and educate these workers/teachers. The professional workforce needed for the expansion is tremendous and a new set of qualifications and pay need to be at the forefront!

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